MND: Brown rice, everybody knows it is good for you. But how good, and is there any risk?

Brown rice is white rice with it’s husk and bran. To produce white rice, the bran layer and the germ in  are removed, leaving mostly the starchy endosperm. (Wiki) In the process many vitamins and dietary minerals are lost. But the worst could be the loss of the polyphenols

Source:

1) Food Chemistry Antioxidant capacities and phenolic compounds of the husk, bran and endosperm of Thai rice Authors: Sunan Butsata and Sirithon Siriamornpun,Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 44000, Thailand;   Received 4 May 2009; revised 27 June 2009; accepted 2 July 2009. Available online 5 July 2009.

MND: Are there any risks, indirectly, yes, if the rice grew in a polluted soil.

Two main issues:

  • Cadmium : This study  was concerned with measured Cadmium levels in the soil and brown rice of Taiwan, since such levels have increased in sync with industrial emissions

Source:

  1. Environmental  Pollution;   Prediction of Cadmium uptake by brown rice and derivation of soil–plant transfer models to improve soil protection guidelines;   P.F.A.M. Römkensa, , , H.Y. Guob, C.L. Chub, T.S. Liub, C.F. Chiangb and G.F. Koopmans;    Soil Science Center, Alterra – Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR), PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands; Taiwan Agricultural Research Institute (TARI), Wufong, Taiwan, ROC.    Received 19 December 2008; revised 3 March 2009; accepted 7 March 2009. Available online 5 April 2009.
    1. Ill effects of cadmium are extensive. They include cancer,lung disease, chest pain, see source 3) for more details

 

  • Arsenic: Arsenic levels are a concern for brown rice grown in the Hainan Island, China. Hence a similar study as the one above. This is to be put in the context a a UNICEF report on arsenic pollution risks for the food supply
    • Arsenic is human carcinogen that has been shown to cause skin, lung, bladder, liver, kidney, and prostate cancer. (Toxtown)

Sources:

1) Environmental Pollution Environmental Pollution Journal; “Occurrence of arsenic in brown rice and its relationship to soil properties from Hainan Island, China” Authors: Yangrong Fua, b, Mulong Chena, b, Xiangyang Bia, c, Yusheng Heb, Limin Rena, Wu Xianga, c, Shengying Qiaoa, c, Sen Yana, c, Zhonggen Lid and Zhendong Maa

2)National Library of Medicine,  Toxtown

3) National Library of Medicine ,  Toxtown

 

MND: Finally this issue has reach activists blog: China’s tainted rice trail; Not a pretty sight

Rice Paddies: Threatened?

 

 

 

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